Tag Archives: sustainability

Sustainable Home – A book review

For Christmas, I was lucky enough to get a copy of Sustainable Home: Practical Projects, Tips and Advice for Maintaining a More Eco-friendly Household by Christine Liu. I really have the best friends!

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Firstly, I would like to say that this an absolutely beautiful book which has been perfectly separated into five sections; living, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and outdoors.

Each sections discusses what changes you could make to live a more sustainable lifestyle and things to consider when making your choices.

I’ve been starting to implement a lot of these changes – here’s the first product review on safety razors

Here’s my book review for Sustainable Home

The author offers excellent advice and includes step-by-step guides, for example, making your own toothpaste – something I am keen to try.

Sustainable Home: Practical Projects, Tips and Advice for Maintaining a More Eco-friendly Household book cover

Sustainable Living

Sustainable living takes you through the benefits of minimalism and the environmental impacts our choices have with an fabulous guide on how to declutter your home; how to decide what to keep and what to do with the things you don’t need anymore.

Following onto the furniture we buy, the benefits and concluding on a guide to indoor plants, something I have recently fallen in love with.

Sustainable Kitchen

Food can be a contentious issue as it’s well documented how much of an impact farming for meat has on the environment. Christine navigates this issue really well giving you information to make your own choices.

If you aren’t able to cut out meat completely, reducing your meat intake still makes a massive difference. I particularly like the guides to making your own cashew and oat milk, I’m looking forward to giving these a go. Sustainable kitchen concludes on some really good tips on reducing food waste.

Sustainable Bedroom

This chapter begins with your wardrobe and how to create a minimalist wardrobe but still maintaining your personal style.

In particular, I loved is repairing and repurposing clothes and I am a superfan of ‘make do and mend’.

Following onto bedroom furniture and concluding the section on how to make your own room spray.

Sustainable Bathroom

A place in your home where you can make the biggest changes to live a more sustainable life is in your bathroom.

This section is jam-packed with ideas and guides on how to make your own toothpaste, body scrub, body butter and lip balm.

This section includes an overview of shampoo and shampoo bars, cleaning, water usage and my favourite of all; the safety razor. I moved away from disposable razors about a year ago and I’ve never looked back.

Outdoors

Inside the home isn’t the only place to make a change, this final section discusses ways in how a workplace can become greener, when you’re eating out and looking at your carbon footprint when you’re out and about.

Conclusion

Firstly, the main thing I love about this book is that is doesn’t preach to me. It’s very well written and easy to read.

There are so many ideas and examples of changes you can make to live more sustainably. It’s okay that you can’t do everything in one go; it’s a marathon, not a race.

Would I recommend this book to others? A massive YES.

If you would like to know more about Christine Liu, here are her links

If you would like to purchase the book – click here

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Safety razor – Product Review

Easy Peasy Greeny is over a year old now and something I was eager to start was product reviews. I already use and am familiar with many eco-friendly products so I might as well start recommending them. I love recommendations, I’m more likely to buy from one and I’m sure I’m not the only one.

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One product I will always recommended is safety razors. I love them! They’ve been around for well over 100 years and I’m glad many people are starting to return to the old way of shaving. I previously wrote a blog about why making the switch is a great choice. As you can tell, I’m a huge fan!

I already own one but I was on the lookout for one with a stand and I came across one for sale with &Keep. So, I ordered it.

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It arrived in plastic-free packaging! A massive thumbs up from me!

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All of the packaging is easily recycled and no plastic in sight. It even includes a blade to get you started and let’s not forget – it has a stand!

How am I getting on?

I’ve been using this for over two weeks and I absolutely love it. It’s very easy to use and my legs feel really smooth. I think it’s actually better than my old one (which I’ve put in my travel bag as a spare – always good to have a spare!). It’s got a good weight to it, easy to handle and the stand allows the razor to drip-dry.

Safety razors tend to be top heavy and the beauty of that is they do all the hard work for you. If you’re a newbie check out my blog for some top tips or you can refer to the user manual.

Pros and cons

Of course, with any product review, there needs to be a pro and con section. Let’s start with the pros

  • Smooth shave
  • Double-edged shaving
  • Easy screw function to replace the blade
  • Handle has grooves for good grip when you’re hands are wet
  • Eco-friendly
  • Good value for money

Cons

  • There isn’t a cover for the head should you wish to put it in your travel bag without having to remove the blade – In fairness, I haven’t seen this with any other safety razor either.

Would I recommend this one?

A massive YES!

These beauties are available in three colours – Black, Rose Gold and Silver and the price is very reasonable.

Here are two UK stockists I have come across.

&Keep – A UK company based in Dorset who sell a wide variety of eco-friendly and sustainable products.

Etsy – This is a UK based seller has 2,766 sales and 423 shop reviews!

I’ve also found this fabulous UK based shop called Know The Origin and they sell double-edged safety razor blades in packs of 100, that’ll last you a while!

As you can tell, I really love supporting UK based businesses!

The amount of razors that end up in landfill (and the oceans) is devastating and take hundreds of years to breakdown and it’s unlikely it would have fully decomposed after all that time. If you look after your razor, it can last a very long time. Plus, it will save you money!

Reusing Water

During the summer, I hang my washing outside. There’s something really rewarding about being able to dry your clothes outside; they smell fresh and it’s free!

However, during the autumn and winter months, it’s a different story. I use my dryer. I’ve looked at other ways to dry clothes but it just didn’t work.

I hung the clothes on the radiator; however, this wouldn’t heat up the room as well as when the radiators were clear of clothing. I bought a load of radiator airers but I found I ran out of radiators to hang all the clothes. This ended up with a continuous cycle of washing and clothes dotted around the house on radiator airers. Not pleasant when you have company.

In order to get all my washing done in a day, I have resorted to using the dryer, however, I have a condenser dryer. For those who aren’t aware, in condenser dryers, any water from the drying clothes is collected in the tank at the bottom. The advantage of having a condenser dryer means it isn’t necessary for a builder to knock a circular a hole in your kitchen wall to create an outlet for the moisture.

Once I hear the beeping from the dryer notifying me that the tank is full and needs emptying, I would remove the tank and empty the water contents down the sink. For some reason I did this automatically and didn’t notice the writing on the tank.

I can’t believe I never noticed this before.

I only use filtered water in the iron so I wouldn’t consider using the water from my condenser dryer but I do have plants. After a washload, I empty the tank into a massive jug I have and leave it next to the sink. I fill up a plastic bottle I have purely for watering the plants and walk around the house doing just that.

I also have a dishwasher and I tend to use tap water to rinse off any remains but I now use my condenser dryer water to rinse the cutlery (if they need it) before I put them in the dishwasher.

I can’t be the only person with a condenser dryer and I wondered what else I could use this water for?

Ways to reuse water

If I had a water butt I could top up the water, that would really come in handy during the spring and summer for watering the plants or even washing the car.

I can’t see any reason why this water can’t be used in the toilet to fill up the cistern tank, I wonder anyone actually does this?

The Story of Plastic

The Story of Plastic was aired in the UK on Earth Day 22nd April 2020. I found the film to be incredibly moving giving us the story of not just where plastic ends up but also where it begins.

Since the 1950s, plastic was seen as an incredible invention with multiple uses and since then it has weaved itself into every aspect of our lives. We are starting to discover the true cost of this material that never actually goes away.

We have been encouraged to separate our rubbish and ensure we recycle as much as we possibly can. As well as metals, glass and paper, we put our plastic in our recycling bins in good faith believing it is being taken away and something useful is made from it, after all, that’s what the word recycle means, doesn’t it? This film shows us what happens to our plastic once it has been collected from our bins.

The focus at the start of the plastic journey was a plastic processioning plant in Texas, USA, where toxic chemicals are released into the local water and air. Tiny plastic pellets end up into local rivers and will eventually be ingested by local marine life which will inevitably enter the food chain. The cancer rates and health issues in the local areas are shockingly high; child leukemia, infertility and respiratory issues.

What I found shocking was that a product sold in a European country displays that it is recyclable but the same product sold in an Asian country in sachets which cannot be recycled. Decisions made in these boardrooms are adding to the plastic problem faced in Asia and companies should be responsible for installing the necessary waste infrastructure.

What is plastic recycling?

The film shows plastic sorted from India and the Philippines discussing the issues faced when it comes to recycling. One point that struck me was that the whole recycling industry is only possible because there is poverty in the world, who else will do it? Most of the plastic from the West is shipped to Asian countries to deal with and it is hand sorted. Unlike other materials, there are around 80 different categories plastic falls into and therefore the sorting process is a time-consuming one.

When a plastic is sorted and can be ‘recycled’, it is washed, melted down and chopped into plastic pellets; the dirty water used to clean the plastic is dumped into a local waterway leading to pollution, the melting process emits harmful chemicals to the workers, who do not have any protective clothing. Incinerators come with their own set of problems too; skin rashes, increase in cancer rates and other health issues.

It turns out that plastic recycling is a myth.

Who does the buck stop with?

Fossil fuel companies have aired their concerns about the pollution caused by plastic but they seem to prefer shifting the blame onto consumers rather than admitting their products are ill-designed. The film shows that these companies aim their products towards the Asian market flooding them with single-use plastics forcing them to be reliant on these products while hiding behind the excuse of a rise in demand.

I would highly recommend everyone watching this film. The plastic issue is everyone’s problem, not just Asian countries (where the west are dumping their plastic).

If you’re interested in this eye-opening film, click below for the trailer

16 Easy Ways To Go Green

In the last year, I have actively changed my habits to go green but sometimes it’s not cheap. We can’t all afford solar panels on our homes or a brand-new electric car (or just a brand-new car for that matter) but there are things we can all do to take a step in the right direction.

One mistake I made was trying to do too many at once, it’s a case of training your mind to start thinking differently. Make two to three changes and then add to it. You will start noticing you have changed your old habits and the new ones are automatic.

Here are my tips to go green

Take your own bags to the shop

You can purchase little tote bags everywhere nowadays and they come in handy little pouches that fit in your pocket or bags. Some even have a clip that you can attach to the outside of your bag.

Change your light bulbs to LED

It’s well known that LED light bulbs used up to 80% less electricity than traditional bulb. Traditional bulbs need more electricity to function.

If you have a condenser dryer, use the water to water the plants

The water tank that collects the water can be used to water your plants rather than throwing it down the sink. Or even, if you have one, add it to your water butt.

Turn off the lights when you are not using them

There is no reason why you should have the lights on in a room you’re not using. It’s a waste of electricity.

Fix any dripping taps

Sometimes, it’s only a case of replacing a washer but the amount of water that is wasted due to a dripping tap is eye-watering. Water is not an infinite resource and shouldn’t be wasted. If you have a dripping tap, call a plumber.

Reuse your old mobile phone

We all have old mobile phones gathering dust in a draw somewhere. Why no utilise it? I downloaded an app so I could use my mobile phone as a CCTV camera. It now sits at the back of the house and alerts me when anyone comes near the back door.

Buy fruit and veg with no packaging and only what you need

A few months ago, this really got to me. I wanted to buy a lemon but the supermarket didn’t have any loose ones, they were only available in packs of four; I didn’t want four. So, I went to a local greengrocer and bought a lemon. The pack of four lemons were sold in that plastic netting that can’t be recycled. No thanks! I wrote a blog about eating seasonal food.

easy ways to go green and towards greener living

Stop Junk mail

What do you do with junk mail? I have a quick flick through and put it into the recycling. What an absolute waste. The easiest way is to create your own sign saying ‘no junk mail’ on your door.

Energy efficient appliances

Appliances are now tested and improved to ensure their efficiency. There are many appliances that now come with a rating of A+, A++ or A+++ tells us that the products has a lower energy consumption.

Clean the back of your fridge

I didn’t know this until very recently. All fridges gather dust at back but how often do you clean the dust? Probably once? Never? The dust makes the fridge work harder which uses more energy. Dust every so often to keep your fridge working efficiently.

Check your tyre pressure regularly

If your tyre pressure is too high or too low, it makes the car work harder to compensate, which uses more fuel.

Print on both sides of the paper

If you have to print something, and it’s not confidential. Keep the paper to one side and if you need to print something else, use the other side. I do this all the time and had saved me quite a bit of money on paper.

Go Green, Go paperless

Do you really need a printed copy of your bank statement? You will probably look at it once, file it then you will eventually shred it. Bank/credit card/ energy statements are all kept online. If you don’t want to keep logging onto your bank to view them, you can download them to your computer or even save them to a cloud storage. Ask yourself, do you really need a printed copy?

Insulate your loft

A lot of heat is lost through the roof due to poor insulation. If this isn’t resolved, you are more likely to increase the thermostat to keep warm. You are best to get a professional in to sort this out for you.

Buy second hand where you can

This is one that I’ve embraced a lot recently. When something is no longer needed but still useful, it can be ditched at the tip, which is a complete waste. I needed a new set of chest of drawers and instead of buying a brand new one for £55, I found a second-hand one on Facebook Marketplace for £8. It was in very good condition apart from a little dent at the back that no one will see. You can also save a lot of money by doing this.

Make do and mend

My favourite go green tip! In my grandmother’s time, she would always say ‘make do and mend’ and I feel that this has been lost through the generations. How many times have you thrown a sock away because it has a whole in them? It won’t take long to sew them up and keep wearing them. You don’t need a sewing machine; a small sewing kit will suffice.

These are my easy tips, of course, this is a subject that I can do on and on about. I will look at writing another blog with further tips.

In the meantime, why do you share your tips on how to go green!

If you’re interested in reading about what I’m doing to be greener, check out my blog and if you’re interested in signing up to my newsletter, click here, I promise not to spam you.