Tag Archives: second hand september

How Buying Second-Hand Can Save You Money

I love buying second-hand and I’ve easily saved a lot of money by doing this. Don’t believe me? Have a look below and see for yourself!

One of the main reason people sell or giveaway their stuff is because it no longer serves its purpose, there’s nothing wrong with it, it’s just no longer needed.

The stigma

A few family members I have spoken to would never dream of buying something second-hand. For some reason, there’s a stigma to it. The thought of buying a pair of jeans from a charity shop that has had a previous owner, they’ll immediately screw up their face as if they’re smelling something really bad. I don’t get it myself, the cars they drive are second-hand!?

Recently, I managed to convert my Mum to second-hand shopping. I genuinely think that was the first time she had been inside a charity shop and her opinion started changing when I picked up a long skirt (that still had it’s original label for £34.99) for sale at £2. What a bargain! When you think about it, that’s not even second-hand; it hasn’t been worn so it’s actually brand new!

Second-hand doesn’t have to just be clothing; books, gifts, furniture, white goods. I do draw the line at underwear, I will buy that brand new!

My second-hand finds

how-buying-second-hand-can-save-you-money-8

My daughter had grown out of her toddler bed and I came across this in a charity shop.

It was previously listed at £125 and was reduced to £85. What a bargain!!

how-buying-second-hand-can-save-you-money-7

This purchase is from a charity shop for £2.50. It still had the original wrapper on it (it is a set of 4, the orange one is in the car).

I’ve seen these around and they’re about £20 brand new.

how-buying-second-hand-can-save-you-money-6

A £5 purchase from a local Facebook selling group.

IKEA don’t sell them anymore and I’ve seen other people selling theirs for between £5 and £15.

how-buying-second-hand-can-save-you-money-5

This was listed on eBay for £50.

I have seen something on various websites on sale for £110.

how-buying-second-hand-can-save-you-money-4

A personal gem for me from eBay for £28 including delivery.

This is a discontinued set and I’ve seen one of these listed for £100 + P&P

(I’m a huuuuuuuuge Lego fan)

how-buying-second-hand-can-save-you-money-3

I bought this from a charity shop for £2. It still had the original label on it and I think it was £30.

how-buying-second-hand-can-save-you-money-2

I bought this for £2 from a charity shop.

how-buying-second-hand-can-save-you-money-1

I needed a set of drawers and these fit perfectly in my wardrobe.

£10 from a local Facebook selling group. Bargain!

Some really great places are

  • Local charity shops
  • Facebook Marketplace
  • Shpock
  • Ebay
  • Boot fairs

Please do share some of your second-hand shop finds, I would love to see them.

If you’re interested in reading about what I’m doing to be greener, keep up to date by signing up to my newsletter, click here, I promise not to spam you.

How I became greener in 2020

I started writing this blog at the beginning of 2020 and as well as writing about my opinions on green issues, I’ve blogged about what I’ve been doing adopt a greener living lifestyle.

As this crazy year draws to a close, I thought it would be a good opportunity to reflect on the changes I made throughout the year.

I found that if you change many things in one go, it becomes overwhelming so the best thing to do is to start a bit at a time and when they become automatic, pick something else. This has definitely worked for me.

Before I start, I think we can all agree that 2020 was a different year to any other. Yes, I am referring to COVID-19. This virus turned the whole world upside down so maybe not the best year to start this but changes still matter, even if they are small ones.

The garden

First thing I did was look at growing some food. I don’t have much of an outside space so it’s not like I could grow many different vegetables but I did successfully grow potatoes and strawberries. Also, I had a broken storage container which I repurposed to grow my potatoes in, really happy with that decision. And the strawberries were a hit too. I’ve been reliably informed there’s a chance I won’t ever have to buy strawberries again, that’s fine with me as I only eat it in the summer.

Zero Waste Shops

I bought more from the local zero waste shop. I absolutely detest throwing away empty plastic containers knowing they won’t be recycled into anything as useful as they previously were so I try, where I can, to buy plastic free. I rock up at the zero-waste shop with my containers and ask for them to be refilled, what could be easier than that?

Fountain pen

I’ve also ditched disposable pens and opted for a fountain pen. Now, I know what you’re thinking – the ink cartridges come in disposable plastic – I have a solution. I bought a bottle of ink, which comes in a glass bottle, and a syringe. Once the ink in the cartridge has run out, I simply refill it. And the result, no plastic to landfill. It helps that I’ve always had a love for fountain pens.

Loose Tea

I love my tea and it’s something I will never give up. When I discovered some teabags are made of plastic and some contained bits of plastic in the glue, I felt a little disgusted. Also, I don’t understand why teabags need to be bleached but that’s a whole different story. Upon doing some research, there are some brands that do not use any plastic in their teabags. I could have just switched to other plastic free bags. But I didn’t. Why? Because in the past, some brands (in general, not tea) quietly change their products and, in truth, I didn’t trust the brands to stick to their words. I know, not very trusting, am I? So, I buy loose tea and I use a tea infuser. As someone who has always made tea with bags, it took a bit of getting used to but now, I don’t notice it.

Print on both sides of the paper

Over the last year or so, I have thought about whether I really need to print something. I’ve moved my business accounts to online and seldom use the printer. When I do have to print something, I automatically put the sheet of paper back in the printer the other side (once I no longer need the printout) so it’s ready to print on the other side as long as it’s not sensitive.

Supermarket receipts

Earlier this year, I found out that supermarket receipts can’t be recycled as they are made from thermal paper. To say I was horrified was an understatement and I even wrote a blog about it. There are some supermarkets that don’t offer you the option to have a receipt but where I am given an option, I don’t request a receipt.

Sugar waxing

I’ve been waxing since my teens and have always used traditional wax strips available in shops. So, when I heard about DIY sugar waxing, I was intrigued. After checking out video upon video on YouTube, I don’t think I use sugar wax how it was intended. From what I can ascertain, you roll up a ball, smooth it on your skin and pull it off quickly, I found that hurt WAY TOO MUCH and was messy. I quickly realised that I needed strips, so I cut up a cotton shirt my partner no longer needed into strips and used them to help me instead. I’m not going to lie, it does still hurts but I don’t feel like my skin is being ripped off, a feeling I have been familiar with from using shop bought wax strips and, what’s better, it’s made of natural ingredients; sugar, lemon, salt and water. It’s a lot cheaper too, to wax both of my legs cost me eighty pence. Bargain and nothing to landfill!

Second-hand September

I took part in Second-hand September and I really enjoyed it. I needed a new pair of jeans which I bought for £3 at a charity shop. That’s not all, I also bought a pack of unused bamboo toothbrushes – £1.99, books for my little one – £6, photo frames £2, Skirt (with the tag still on) – £2 and so much more. I’ve even introduced my Mum to charity shop. She’s in her sixties and had never been in a charity shop. She now loves it and sees that not everything needs to be brand new.

Toothbrushes

I found a pack of four unused bamboo toothbrushes in my local charity shop for £1.99. Once I have done with it, I can continue using them to clean around taps etc or I will pull the bristles out and put them in my eco brick and dispose of the bamboo in the compost.

I am so happy with the changes I have made in 2020 and have managed to encourage my family to join me. I’m looking forward to seeing what 2021 brings and the further changes I can make.

This proves anyone can make a change; you just need to start somewhere.