Tag Archives: repair

How Buying Second-Hand Can Save You Money

I love buying second-hand and I’ve easily saved a lot of money by doing this. Don’t believe me? Have a look below and see for yourself!

One of the main reason people sell or giveaway their stuff is because it no longer serves its purpose, there’s nothing wrong with it, it’s just no longer needed.

The stigma

A few family members I have spoken to would never dream of buying something second-hand. For some reason, there’s a stigma to it. The thought of buying a pair of jeans from a charity shop that has had a previous owner, they’ll immediately screw up their face as if they’re smelling something really bad. I don’t get it myself, the cars they drive are second-hand!?

Recently, I managed to convert my Mum to second-hand shopping. I genuinely think that was the first time she had been inside a charity shop and her opinion started changing when I picked up a long skirt (that still had it’s original label for £34.99) for sale at £2. What a bargain! When you think about it, that’s not even second-hand; it hasn’t been worn so it’s actually brand new!

Second-hand doesn’t have to just be clothing; books, gifts, furniture, white goods. I do draw the line at underwear, I will buy that brand new!

My second-hand finds

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My daughter had grown out of her toddler bed and I came across this in a charity shop.

It was previously listed at £125 and was reduced to £85. What a bargain!!

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This purchase is from a charity shop for £2.50. It still had the original wrapper on it (it is a set of 4, the orange one is in the car).

I’ve seen these around and they’re about £20 brand new.

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A £5 purchase from a local Facebook selling group.

IKEA don’t sell them anymore and I’ve seen other people selling theirs for between £5 and £15.

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This was listed on eBay for £50.

I have seen something on various websites on sale for £110.

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A personal gem for me from eBay for £28 including delivery.

This is a discontinued set and I’ve seen one of these listed for £100 + P&P

(I’m a huuuuuuuuge Lego fan)

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I bought this from a charity shop for £2. It still had the original label on it and I think it was £30.

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I bought this for £2 from a charity shop.

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I needed a set of drawers and these fit perfectly in my wardrobe.

£10 from a local Facebook selling group. Bargain!

Some really great places are

  • Local charity shops
  • Facebook Marketplace
  • Shpock
  • Ebay
  • Boot fairs

Please do share some of your second-hand shop finds, I would love to see them.

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Repurpose and reuse – Clear tape plastic core

Have you got things around your home that no longer has a purpose? Do you really need to throw them out or can you repurpose it to use them elsewhere in your home?

Since I’ve been more aware of the things I buy and more importantly, the things I throw in the bin. I can’t help but look what what I’m just about to throw away and ask myself “Can I reuse this somehow?”. I’ve recently noticed that it seems to be automatic.

I’ve repurposed these items into things I actually needed around the house rather than hoarding them and I’m all for sharing my ideas.

Repurposing is all about being creative – use your imagination

Repurpose plastic core

We’re going to look at the plastic core you’re left over when you’ve finished a roll of clear tape (some are cardboard cores which can be easily recycled, but not all)

Years ago, I bought a bunch of small clear tape refills and I’ve still got quite a few left. Rather than throwing away unused clear tape (which makes no sense at all) I’m using up what I have before I move towards an eco-friendly alternative.

When the sellotape is finished, what do you do with the plastic core?

Repurpose and Reuse - Clear Tape Plastic Core

They’re quite strong, maybe I could give these to a school for their junk modelling?

Well, I have found a fantastic way to reuse these.

In an effort to reduce my waste, I wanted an alternative to using tin foil or baking paper when I put something in the oven. The answer to this wasteful problem? silicone sheets. The only problem was that these sheets were far too flimsy to store. I needed to find a way to stand them up and take up less space.

And voila!!

My silicone sheets are nice and neat and I found a great use for these plastic cores. Another use for these can be napkin rings. Either way, they won’t be going to landfill! Hooray!

Notice I put them in a big Cadbury’s Hot Chocolate tin? These tins are mixed materials so wouldn’t have been easy to recycle.

When you’re about to throw something away, look at it and ask yourself ‘Can I repurpose this?’

If you repurposed anything and saved it from landfill, we would love to see them

If you’re interested in reducing your household waste, grab my free download

Decluttering my clothes

I have too many clothes! There, I said it! Not something a female would admit to, but there it is. It’s a fact.

I can easily declutter anything else around my home but I seem to be unable to part with my clothes. For most of my adult life until I had a child, I was size 12. Once I had my daughter, I’ve become a size 14. Being a bigger size has never bothered me, I’m happy with my figure and don’t see the point in stressing out about it. I don’t bother dieting so there isn’t a likelihood that I will one day magically fit into my size 12 clothes. But, I still can’t bear to part from them, whether they fit me or not.

Even clothes that still fit me, I probably haven’t worn for a year or two. I’ve got a few size 14 evening dresses in my wardrobe but I don’t go anywhere to wear them; what’s the point in keeping them. The whole ‘I may wear it one day’ reason is getting old.

I recently read about the environmental impact ‘fast fashion’ is having on the planet. Brand new clothes can be bought so cheaply, in most cases, the quality is incredibly low and is discarded after a few months. Some materials used to make clothes don’t degrade and will sit in landfill, possibly for centuries.

I’m self-employed and work from home so I don’t have to worry about dressing for the office; I practically live in jeans. A while ago, someone conducted an experiment where all the denim was removed from a pair or stretch jeans and what do you think was left? Plastic! It looked like a plastic skeleton shaped in a pair of jeans. To say I was horrified was an understatement. I didn’t realise how much plastic was in a pair of jeans. Since then, I repair my jeans.

So this is year, I’m going to do something about decluttering my wardrobe.

On 1st January, I have turned all hangers around and throughout the year, I will pick my clothes, as usual. By the end of the year, any hangers still facing the other way will be donated to a charity shop. If I have no use for it, someone else will.

Decluttering my clothes

Recently, I’ve started buying clothes from a charity shop and I’m a big fan of ‘make do and mend’ (I’m not great with a sewing machine but it’s all practice).

For years the last 20 years, I randomly bought clothes not realising the environmental impact of my choices.

We all need to do better.

I will do a blog next year to see how I got on.

My blog has been listed Top 15 UK Sustainable Living Blogs And Websites To Follow in 2021