Tag Archives: food wrap

9 reasons to eat seasonal food

A few weeks ago, I was reading an article about seasonal food in the UK. The article discussed what seasonal food in the UK was and how many could I name. I’m embarrassed to admit I hardly knew what was in season in the UK and when. Have you wondered how far the food sitting on your plate has actually travelled?

We are spoilt for choice as our supermarkets are open around the clock and, thanks to the advances in technology and globalisation, they are packed high with fruit and vegetables from all around the world: Avocados from Mexico, Bananas from India, Strawberries from Spain.

Eating seasonally focuses on a produce that has been grown, harvested and finally ready for consumption shortly afterwards. It also includes produce that hasn’t had to travel over long distances. For example, across a continent.

So, why should we be eating seasonal food?

Let’s have a look at some of the reasons…

  1. Buying seasonal food will help reduce your carbon footprint as the food hasn’t travelled long distances.
  2. Eating seasonal food means the produce is at it’s best in flavour and health benefits because it’s been harvested at the right time. Our farmers know their stuff!
  3. You know where your food came from. There’s something really special about eating food that has been grown in the UK, or even in the same county!
  4. They require minimal pesticides which can strip the soil from essential nutrients and enter the water supply.
  5. When foods have to be chilled for transport, some produce can lose its nutritional value.
  6. Seasonal food allows a greater variety in your diet and you’ve got something to look forward to.
  7. When you’re buying food from a supermarket that has had to import the food, there will be more steps in the supply chain, which could lead to damaged food. Seasonal food means a much shorter supply chain.
  8. Locally grown food is less likely to come in plastic packaging.
  9. Last, but not least, you’ll be supporting a local business.

What foods are in season and when?

I’m so glad you asked!

After realising I had no idea what was in season in the UK and when, I decided to do some research. This prompted me to create a handy chart showing what is grown and when.

You can use these guides to help you plan your weekly meals.

Just by having this information easily at your fingertips will help you think about where your food has come from the next time you go shopping. If it’s in season, it will help reduce your environmental impact too. Plus, it will be tastier because it will be at it’s best. Sounds like a win/win to me!

If you enjoyed this blog, please sign up to my newsletter and you’ll get new blogs delivered right to your inbox and a free download too! (I promise not to spam you, that’s not my thing!)

Things I No Longer Buy

Over the past year, I’ve become more aware of my carbon footprint which has made me make some changes in my life. The things we buy have a carbon footprint; production, transport etc so I’ve stopped buying certain items I realised I personally didn’t need anymore

Plastic Bottles

I’ve actively refuse to buy drinks in a plastic bottle. I have quite a few reusable bottles and when I go out with my daughter, I make sure I fill up a bottle for her. She also has a water bottle she takes to school everyday. When my partner comes home from a football match after eating his fried chicken on the train, he always buys a plastic bottle on water. I’ve used this bottle for things like watering the plants in the house. Ideally, I would prefer if he took a water bottle with him…I’m working on it!

Shopping Plastic Bags

Reusable bags can be bought from anywhere and there is no excuse to have to purchase plastic carrier bags from the supermarket. It helps if you have a few bags in your handbag, car, workplace desk. They will always come in handy.

Strawberries

I know this is going to sound like a weird one but I love eating strawberries and they are always sold in the plastic tub with a sheet of bubble wrap at the bottom. I know strawberries can be easily bruised and need protection but this packaging really irks me. I started growing strawberries in my garden and although I won’t be able to eat strawberries all year round, when they’re in season, I nip out to the garden and pick what I want.

Clothes

The only time I buy clothes brand new is when I need underwear, which isn’t that often anyway. Some friends and family turn their noses up at charity shops but it’s never bothered me. Quite a few months ago I needed a hat a scarf, I washed my hat and shrunk, a lot! I found a hat and scarf for £2 each, bargain! I bought a pair of jeans for £3. I even buy furniture too.

Cling Film

I’ve stopped using cling film a while ago and I’m trying to get my Mum to do the same. For leftover food, I put the food in reusable plastic containers or reusable wraps. There are plenty on the market to choose from.

Dishcloths

I don’t buy new dishcloths anymore, I just chuck them in the washing machine with the rest of the washing.

Loose fruit and veg

I make a conscious effort to buy loose fruit and vegetables at the supermarket. I will never understand why buying four apples loose costs more than buying four apples in plastic wrap. I think it’s something to do with the grade of the item but I think it’s just a cop out. Give us more choice.

Making changes to our habits takes time, when we realise we’ve changed your shopping habits, we need to keep adding more. It’s a marathon, not a sprint.

What things have you given up?

Alternatives to Cling Film

Majority of homes in the UK will have cling film in their kitchens. Used to wrap sandwiches and cover left over food, we’ve been using this product for decades. It’s not a friend to the environment and there are alternatives out there.

What exactly is cling film?

Cling film is a single use plastic that cannot be recycled. As with other plastics, it is harmful to the environment. As it breaks down, the particles get smaller but will never fully disappear. The smaller the particle, the more chance of it being ingested by animals and even a possibility of it entering our food chain.

Cling film is usually made from Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) and there has been some concern about these materials attaching to food and drink. It’s believed the main issue arises when it’s heated up in the microwave.

I stopped using cling film about a year ago and although I’ve still got a roll in my kitchen drawer, the thought of using it makes me a little queasy. I’m not sure what I will do with it but it’s in the drawer not getting in anyone’s way.

What are the alternatives

Lunch box of fruit

Another thing I’ve done before is to cover the dish containing the leftovers with a plate or a bowl. I’ve done this for years and I know my mum does too. The benefit of this is that you can stack another dish on top.

Something that has appeared in the last few years are silicone lids. I have never tried these myself but I’ve heard some really good things about them. They come in different colours, shapes and sizes allowing them to cover dishes in various sizes. As someone who hasn’t tried them yet, I can’t personally recommend them but the small downside I can see is that you can’t stack on top of them. Although, that is a small price to pay for saving the environment.

I have been told wax paper is a brilliant alternative to cling film. It works very well with wrapping cold foods, but don’t use it for anything hot, the wax will melt.

Bees wax wraps

The long term

Not using cling film may seem small, but the difference it will make to the environment is huge. It really does matter. Wildlife won’t get wrapped up in them and suffocate, if they blow into rivers and eventually drift into the sea, marine life won’t confuse them with food. Cling film may not cost a lot of money but by using the alternatives, you will be saving yourself some money in the long-run and make a massive difference to the environment.