Tag Archives: Download

Reduce Your Household Waste Consumption

The amount of waste us Brits throw away is eye-watering and I wasn’t aware of how much household waste is created.

In March 2020, The Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) produced a report which shows how much household waste is currently being produced in the UK each year.

  • It is estimated that the UK generated 41.1 million tonnes of commercial and industrial (C&I) waste in 2016, of which 33.1 million tonnes (around four-fifths) was generated in England. The latest estimates for England only indicate that C&I waste generation was around 36.1 million tonnes in 2017 and 37.2 million tonnes in 2018.
  • The UK generated 221.0 million tonnes of total waste in 2016, with England responsible for 85% of the UK total.

221 million tonnes!

What does this household waste mean?

Let’s put that into context. I’ve got a Seat Leon car which weighs about 1.2 tonnes. That’s about 184 million Seat Leons. That’s a whole lot of household waste and it’s not sustainable at all!

We have become a throw away society. Things can be bought so cheaply now which means the quality isn’t high and certain products don’t last long anymore or they aren’t made to last.

I just want to add that I’m sure there are those who would love to have the money to buy good quality products that last longer but finances dictate your purchases.

In order to reduce what we throw away, we need to be smarter when buying products and looking at the packaging and the quality of the product. WE are the ones who spend the money and WE have a lot more power than we realise.

Companies will create and sell products based on demand, if the demand is dropping off, the product will eventually become obsolete.

The amount of packaging that comes with products is astonishing and it’s these choices we have to adapt.

I’ve been careful about what I buy so my bin isn’t overflowing every week. I’ve been actively reducing my household waste but that isn’t possible for everyone. So, I created a download to help you do just that.

I’ve written how how I’m trying to reduce my consumption you may want to check out

How I became greener in 2020

Ditching tea bags

My Local zero-waste shop

Here’s what I’ve come up with

Here’s my Household Waste Analysis. Each day has its own page covering 10 – 14 days (whichever you choose) and separated into four sections

  • Recycling
  • Composting/Food Waste
  • Donating/Selling online
  • Landfill

Plus, it’s an editable form so you don’t even have to print it off! Last thing I want to do is add to your household waste!

Oh yeah, and it’s FREE! Who doesn’t like a freebie?! Get yours here

Household waste analysis download

Each day you can record what is in your rubbish and save the document. Once you get to the end of the 10 days (or 14 days), you will have a full analysis of what you are throwing away.

When you see it in black and white, it may shock you!

The last page will give you ideas on how you can reduce your waste.

If you’re ready to start reducing your household waste, get your free download below.

I genuinely believe we have a serious consumption issue that we can’t recycle our way out of.

Please do let me know how you get on πŸ’š πŸ’š πŸ’š

9 reasons to eat seasonal food

A few weeks ago, I was reading an article about seasonal food in the UK. The article discussed what seasonal food in the UK was and how many could I name. I’m embarrassed to admit I hardly knew what was in season in the UK and when. Have you wondered how far the food sitting on your plate has actually travelled?

We are spoilt for choice as our supermarkets are open around the clock and, thanks to the advances in technology and globalisation, they are packed high with fruit and vegetables from all around the world: Avocados from Mexico, Bananas from India, Strawberries from Spain.

Eating seasonally focuses on a produce that has been grown, harvested and finally ready for consumption shortly afterwards. It also includes produce that hasn’t had to travel over long distances. For example, across a continent.

So, why should we be eating seasonal food?

Let’s have a look at some of the reasons…

  1. Buying seasonal food will help reduce your carbon footprint as the food hasn’t travelled long distances.
  2. Eating seasonal food means the produce is at it’s best in flavour and health benefits because it’s been harvested at the right time. Our farmers know their stuff!
  3. You know where your food came from. There’s something really special about eating food that has been grown in the UK, or even in the same county!
  4. They require minimal pesticides which can strip the soil from essential nutrients and enter the water supply.
  5. When foods have to be chilled for transport, some produce can lose its nutritional value.
  6. Seasonal food allows a greater variety in your diet and you’ve got something to look forward to.
  7. When you’re buying food from a supermarket that has had to import the food, there will be more steps in the supply chain, which could lead to damaged food. Seasonal food means a much shorter supply chain.
  8. Locally grown food is less likely to come in plastic packaging.
  9. Last, but not least, you’ll be supporting a local business.

What foods are in season and when?

I’m so glad you asked!

After realising I had no idea what was in season in the UK and when, I decided to do some research. This prompted me to create a handy chart showing what is grown and when.

You can use these guides to help you plan your weekly meals.

Just by having this information easily at your fingertips will help you think about where your food has come from the next time you go shopping. If it’s in season, it will help reduce your environmental impact too. Plus, it will be tastier because it will be at it’s best. Sounds like a win/win to me!

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